About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
MSNBCW 10
CSPAN 8
CNNW 7
CSPAN2 4
KQED (PBS) 4
CNBC 2
KCSM (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 53
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
by osama bin laden when he was leading al qaeda. they weren't always followed and they didn't always trigger this kind of response. >> exactly. richard aeengel, thanks to you. there's been a higher threat level, a lot of extra security there but they're telling you this is unrelated to what is going on in the middle east and in north africa. >> it is, andrea. what we're hearing from former and current military and intelligence officials in pakistan is that although it is a separate incident that they're dealing with in pakistan, it is certainly when you take a step back and look at it parallel in many ways. over the weekend in islamabad the capital city of pakistan was shut down. we are told this was prompted by an intelligence intercept of communications, possibly between two taliban leaders, talking about a potential target attack in islamabad. maybe on a pakistani target though. not necessarily on american or international target. we're told that could have been navy force -- sorry. air force target or a navy installation or even an intelligence office in or around the capital. wh
:00 a.m. that the takedown of osama bin laden occurred. someone with my left had a lot to do with that. more on that later. a special welcome to the ambassador of
desperate for the syrian people. the pakistani doctor who helped track down osama bin laden has reduced.ail sentence he was sentenced to 33 years in prison on various charges but now a new trial has been ordered. the egyptian police have arrested two senior members of the muslim brotherhood as the authorities continue to crack down on the organization. a former member of parliament and a former labor minister. one of the most vocal opponents was wanted by police on allegations of incitement to violence. the national football league has a landmark settlement with whosands of former players suit the nfl over concussions. out $765will pay million for medical benefits and injury compensation for the retired players and their families. this is pending court approval. still to come on tonight's program, cuba will get back in the professional boxing ring after 50 years on the sidelines. across america, workers at fast the companies have staged largest strike to date as part of a campaign for higher wages. they want to earn $15 per hour. we have this report. >> she shares this two-bedroom apart
tracked osama bin laden leading up to the raid that took his life. >>> and the nfl prepares to pay out millions of dollars to players suffering from head trauma. just by talking to a helmet. it grabbed the patient's record before we even picked him up. it found out the doctor we needed was at st. anne's. wiggle your toes. [ driver ] and it got his okay on treatment from miles away. it even pulled strings with the stoplights. my ambulance talks with smoke alarms and pilots and stadiums. but, of course, it's a good listener too. [ female announcer ] today cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everything works like never before. individualization that your body needs. this labor day, don't invest in a mattress until you visit a sleep number store. when we actually lower the sleep number setting to get the sleep number bed to conform to them, it's amazing the transition that you see with people. oh, that feels really good.it's hugging my body. they just look at you like you cured all the problems they've ever had. we hear it all the time: "i didn't know a bed could feel like t
of lebanon. meanwhile, osama bin laden was watching these events unfold and essentially learned the lesson that america was cowardly, that they couldn't take a punch in the nose and that emboldened him to later on launch the attacks that we know he launched. i keep coming back to that because to me it seems like we have to figure out what type of strikes, what targets to strike. but isn't the bottom line here that the president said we have this red line of chemical weapons and if you cross that there will be enormous consequences. if we fail to deliver those enormous consequences, we lose all of our credibility in the reason gone, we lose all of our ability to act as a deterrent. iran is watching this and learning perhaps the same lessons that osama bin laden learned in 1983. >> krystal, the fact is international law was violated. the president's statement of crossing the red line occurred six to eight months ago. syria's used chemical weapons some months ago. in fact, some reports indicate that he's used this some number of times, even 100 times on a much limited scale. the red line bein
had been worth despite osama bin lauden. where do we draw the line? >> i think not just the ambiguous outcomes in the wars in afghanistan but also the libyan situation in which they thought we were doing good in the world, and we helped overthrow gaddafi, and then we had ambassador chris stevens, who was really a hero in the benghazi area killed in that very city when he was ambassador and then they have seen egypt and yemen erupt and i think they writely believed that america's apparent america'sability to flinfluencee evenltsdz would be limited and it's costly to try. >> almost a year anniversary of the benghazitac. it was airstrikes on libya. that was what many are proposing now for syria, and now, it seems like the situation in libya is much worse than it was under gaddafi in certain ways. >> i think any time you get involved in a war, you cannot entirely predict the outcome. so i think there is certainly a war weariness in the u.s. but a war wariness as well. people really are worried about these sorts of things. but i do believe that the use of chemical weapons, the use of these
said about the state of al qaeda the last year. take a look. >> today, al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. >> for al qaeda is a shell of its former self. groups must be dealt with. >> the united states is never going to retreat from the world. >> we don't get terrorized. >> senator, a moment ago, you said al qaeda is on the rise. you are not subjecting that al qaeda is stronger than it was pre9/11. >> i'm saying they me taft sized in a way they may pose threat threats throughout the middle east, they can destabilize missions, have acts of terror literally everywhere and there the perception throughout the mid aefeasdle east that there i policy and that there is accommodation it that reality. when they believe that, then you are going to see extremist element on the rise and clearly they are throughout the middle east. action of closing embassies shows they are mounting threats everywhere in the middle east against the united states of america and they are playing in ways that is going to pose challenge to the united states for years to come. >> you talked earlier about r
of afghanistan and pakistan. that is no longer the case. osama bin laden is no longer their plotting against the u.s. and our allies. a does not mean there is not continuing threat posed by al qaeda, but that does not mean but that threat has changed because of the president's willingness to use force. there are other ways to work with the international community to reach objectives. the president took a trip to africa where he highlighted some of the strong relationships the united states has there. this is the work that the president vowed to do when he took office, which is to rebuild some of the relationships that were in tatters when this president entered the oval office. that strengthens the united states on the international scene. it is good for broader national security interests. but it is something that the president and members of his team have to work on something -- have to work on every day. >> more than 100,000 people have been killed. that is effectively like wiping out the entire city of south bend, indiana. how many more people need to die before the u.s. does employ some
administration after the bombing of our embassies, osama bin laden concluded america was unserious with the course. three years later, we had 9/11. >> you have to ask the question, is limited punitive strike worse than doing nothing. i am not sure that's true. >> then there's the libya example, they sent in 110 tomahawk missiles, british and u.s. war ships, then there was a nato enforced fly zone for six months, which ended with a civil war with gadhafi being deposed. the problem with syria is more complicated because the rebel situation is more complicated. and you've got the potentially unsecure wmd of chemicals. >> we're going to continue this. final word on this topic? >> i think it is a question of are you serious or not. assad will understand it is a punitive strike, he emerges from the smoke essentially unhurt strategically, he wins this round. and it will have been for nothing and risking all of the things that nina talked about needlessly. >>> next up, continuing this topic, how to fight another war, and the push back coming not very loud but still coming. max and penny ke
the c.i.a. find osama bin laden. he worked for u.s. intelligence collecting d.n.a. to verify bin laden's presence. he was sentenced to prison in may of 2012. >> india has arrested its most wanted criminal, held on wednesday on the eastern border with nepal. the group has been linked to a group claiming responsibility for attacks in india. we are joined live from new delhi with more on that story. what can you tell us about the arrest? >> he was arrested on the indian-nipal border. it was a secret operation, he was arrested along with three other people. what we should say, though is it's unclear where the process goes from here or which stage it is at following his arrest. it will be watched with extreme interest across the country and region particularly for a country that certainly wanted a glimpse into the indian mujahedeen for sometime. >> all right. thanks very much for joining us out of new delhi. >> employee's teams in china are struggling with surging water levels after 33,000 people she cram waited. the military have been along the river. we have more. >> i know everyone's tir
aggressive when you look on the policy of drones, going in and getting osama bin laden, something the bush administration failed to do. and he's alsoing more cautious. if you look at the way we dealt with libya and egypt, sort of backing off and sort of supporting what we saw as the goals of the arab street without putting boots on the ground, so this president who was famously cautious about iraq is now in an awkward position. the things we were told about saddam hussein are actually true in libya, and we have this caution. >> we are talking about the republicans in their her to the president, a lot of people were questioning where they were yesterday at the march on washington, the celebration. we have dr. martin luther king's speech yesterday, but i want to show -- i'm sorry. we don't have that sound, but what i do have is the information that john boehner and eric cantor were invited to be there, and they decided not to be there. mlk was a registered republican, wasn't he? >> according to one family member. >> his father was. >> his father was. >> why would republicans take a distant a
ordered the retrial of a doctor who helped the cia find osama bin laden. he had worked for u.s. intelligence by collecting dna to verify bin laden's presence. he was sentenced to 33 years in prison on may 2012 for being a member of a militant group. both he and the group deny this. >>> one of the most wanted men in india has been arrested. he's the alleged founder of the indian mujahadeen and has been accused of a series of bombing. >> reporter: indian authorities have been searching for him in connection with a string of terrorist attacks in india between 2008 and 2013. they allege he orchestrated this attack in mumbai in 2011. three simultaneous bomb blasts rocked the country's financial capital during evening rush hour, killing at least 18 people and injuring 131 others. the arrest comes just weeks after another man the government alleges to be a key figure of the militant group was captured in the same area. the director general of the police force says these arrests are significant. >> so far with the infiltration of the minds of people running it, and getting them has b
about the intelligence community tracking of osama bin laden. the raid it says was guided by a group of satellites in space which pointed dozens of separate receivers of pakistan to collect a vast amount of data as the mission took place. it noticed the united states watches allies and enemies. counter intelligence operations are strategically focused against targets of china, russia, iran, cuba and israel. >> i don't think that would surprise anybody who we are collecting against and also what we think our major concerns are in the world. it makes sense to have that in the budget. it would be better for it nout to be out in the public domain. >> reporter: north korea says what are described as five critical gaps in u.s. intelligence about nuclear and missile programs and analysts knowing almost nothing about the intentions of new leader, kim jong-un. interesting that it was revealed in a story leaked by former contract employee, snowden, one of their own. >> much more on this with the panel. >>> a disturbing look at the fort hood shooter before his attack. >>> here is what our fox a
in "the washington post" offering more detail about the raid that killed osama bin laden, it says forensic intelligence agents working in afghanistan confirmed his identity eight hours after he was killed using dna from his corpse. "the post" information is based on data from leaker edward snowden. >>> friday marks san diego mayor bob filner's final day in office at 5:00, city council president todd gloria will take over as interim mayor and a special election is set for november 19th. gloria allred is celebrating his last day, she represents several women harassed by filner. >>> new york is a great place but it took a couple of kittens to shut down the subway, service came to a halt thursday for 90 minutes as they looked for the fugitive fee lines, the rail could be deadly to an unsuspecting cat. at first there was no luck finding the kittens but they were found hours later and taken to a local animal shelter. it would really anger commuters, but come on, look at that face. >> got to save the kittens. good stuff. >> and they did. that's some good news. we'll take a break here on "new day.
is never going to retreat from the world. we don't get terrorized. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. [ cheers ] >> because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. >> over overnight in yemen which is on high alert the u.s. conducted its sixth punishing drone strike in ten days. the yemeni government said six suspected al qaeda members were killed. 29 suspected al qaeda terrorists have been taken out by u.s. drones in the past ten days. new throats from al qaeda forced the evacuation of the u.s. embassy in yemen. among those outposts shut down through at least saturday by terror concerns. i wan
the u.s. find and kill osama bin laden. the judge cited procedural issues, and ordered a new trial. dr. shakil afridi faced 33 years behind bars for providing money and medical help to islamic militants, allegations he denied. he also ran a vaccination program for the c.i.a. that helped locate bin laden. another major disclosure has emerged from documents leaked by former intelligence analyst edward snowden. the so-called "black budget" details $52 billion in spending this year, for secret u.s. intelligence efforts. "the washington post" reports that, among other things, the national security agency was investigating up to 4,000 reports of possibly security breaches by its own employees, last year. in economic news, the commerce department announced growth last spring was much better than first estimated at an annual rate of 2.5%. the numbers helped wall street overcome worries about syria. the dow jones industrial average gained 16 points to close near 14,841. the nasdaq rose almost 27 points to close at 3,620. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff:
libya, and putting the special forces into pakistan to get to osama bin laden, those were cases where the president wanted to be careful and get to a specific end game. here, i think we're not looking for an open-ended military conflict. but the military strategy is probably on the president's desk. that the joint chiefs are probably looking at right now. i've been in some of the rooms where the military options have been discussed. the number one reason, to degrade his capabilities, to deter him from doing this again. we have lost some of it, it is to hold at risk something that assad values. so if we can put in our sight those things we values, the military command in control, the military headquarters, the rocket-firing capabilities, and some of his air offensive, that can be accomplished. >> can that be accomplished with military strikes? >> it can be accomplished, we just put on station a fifth guided missile destroyer, the uss stout came to the eastern area today. we'll have enough fire power, while we would love to have allies like the brits, we don't need them for fire power,
in places even if osama bin laden is not. one other point in there that is not discussed is central africa and what is going on there. >> and malwi and nigeria. >> how does the president need to come out of this to gain credibility and not letting as the congressman said every death spot around the world to utilize destruction. >> that is the quandary he finds himself. this is a president who he first was in power put his faith in word. he thought he could talk the world down from the -- and to some degree, his hands were tied. america was going through an economic crisis. it was extended in two foreign wars. so words were the only real weapon he had at the time. he extended rhetorically an open hand to some of the dictators in the region. they responded with a closed fist. so now he finds himself in a position he has to act and ironically, he has put himself in that position to some degree with saying assad has to go and saying a red line if assad uses chemical weapons against his own people, there will be consequences. the president's own words now force him into action. it's hard to see
zinni, you oversaw bill clinton's attempt to kill osama bin laden in 2008 and you warned against president bush's mistakes in iraq. do you believe that president obama is on the verge of making a mistake in syria? >> i think, you know, he's made the commitment and he's put down the red line, and i think it's inevitable now that he has to follow through. if -- to not follow through would embolden assad and tell him he could use chemical weapons. i would make one point, which is really critical here, this is not about supporting the united states or a united states move. this is about the chemical weapons convention. 191 countries signed on to this, including the british and others, and i think that the administration should have made a better case that this is sort of separate from involvement in long-term in this civil war. it's about enforcement of something that 191 countries signed on and only five countries have refused to do it. >> well, i think the president has tried to make that -- we'll get back to that in a moment. let me ask colonel leighton, the white house released i
. the most famous of all in 1998 when they were launched at osama bin laden in afghanistan only to have three years later launch the 911 attacks against the u.s. >> you're right, indeed. thank you, mick. joining me in studio, congressman gregory meeks, a member of the house foreign affairs committee. representative meeks, i understand you were briefed last night in a conference call. tell me what you learned from that call. >> i learned, first of all, the president has not made a decision yet, which i think is a good thing. >> contingent upon what? do you know what it is will be the tipping point? >> i don't know what it is. i hope he looks at it in its totality. you know, i was with the president most of the time. but i said from the beginning what is beginning is what should be the united states doing something unilateral. what is concerning me is all the reporting i'm hearing now. it's not the international community, it's the united states. it's not nato, it is the united states. >> france said they will offer support. >> there's so many other countries. we don't know, for example, where
with singing songs to osama bin laden and the 9/11 terror attacks. there's been a radical change in a lot of the makeup of the armed opposition which just doesn't look like the peaceful protests that we saw 2 1/2 years ago starting, calling for democracy and freedom after 40 years of dictatorships fr from the assad leadership. >> where does that leave the assad regime right now. fred flepleitgen, a short time , ben wedeman was speaking to members in the regime who told him they were relieve bid this delay, that president obama has put the brakes on at least for ten days asking congress for a vote. the syrian regime, he says, relieved and perhaps even planning a new offensive to squeeze in there over the next several days. before you left, what did you see in terms of movement in the regime's assets and what have you heard over the last several days? >> the regime has been stepping up its effort, especially in the damascus area over the past couple of days. the interesting thing was it really coincided with that alleged chemical weapons attack. many people on the ground were talking to us
don't see how a president who ran for his second term boasting about how he got osama bin laden, one bullet to the head and another to the heart has any grounds to quarrel with the concept. but the white house does not seem to be on board with that suggestion. here is jay carney at the press briefing. >> the president weighs his options. does he want to take out asad and would his death be a welcomed outcome at this white house? >> i appreciate the question and i want to make clear that the opgs we're considering are not about regime change. they are about responding to clear violation of an international standard that prohibits the use of chemical weapons. jon: brett stephens jon:s us now. you think jay is wrong. >> yes. and i think what we risk doing is an operation that puts the u.s. airmen, soldiers and sailors potentially in harm's way to accomplish very little. you don't undertake a military strike unless you have a genuine military objective. you don't undertake military strikes just to make a political statement or vindicate the president's threat from last year and earlier t
the navy seal team six. that's the same unit that killed osama bin laden. >>> she wanted to see a rhino up close. so a woman at the denver zoo made an extra $60 for a special meet and greet. but the animal wasn't on board, not as friendly. he attacked her, biting her finger when she reached out to feed it. >> he's not in trouble. we do not believe this was an aggressive action. i think this was just a very terrible, unfortunate accident. >> gretchen: no word on her condition this morning. the denver zoo has suspended its rhino meet and greet program. i guess it's a good idea. >>> we showed you the video. a woman gets called on stage to sing a duet with kristen chenowith. little did kristen know the fan could really belt it out. ♪ ♪ >> oh, sing it, sing it! >> gretchen: we just found out that fan who happens to be a vocal coach was just invited back to the stage. the hollywood bowl asking her to perform again next month. you never know, eric. you've got to be in the right place at the right time. >> eric: you know why the rhino bit the lady's finger off? the zoo charged 60 bucks. the rh
people would say that president obama the very right to launch azeinab badawi race that killed osama bin laden. history and diplomacy co-exist. they interact with each other and they sometimes can complement each other. richard holbrooke, the late richard holbrooke, great american diplomat, i don't think he would have been able to secure the peace in bosnia had we not used force for six weeks to demonstrate to the bosnian-serb army that we were not going to permit them to continue to kill innocent muslims. and it was that use of force that achieved the cease-fire and drove them to the negotiating table where holbrook worked his magic and brought peace to bosnia after five years of war. so there are times when we have to rely on our military and we're fortunate, as all of you know, to have extraordinary young men and women in our military and the army and the navy and the air force, marines and the coast guard and the national guard. [applause] and, like you, who just applauded, i admire the american military. they are absolutely critical to our security. one of the proudest moments of my
. but i think is pretty clear what he was trying to say, which is anytime you can take osama bin laden off the board and kind of decimates the rest of their leadership, and by the way this administration has been extremely aggressive in the use of drone strikes in various places that we don't have boots on the ground. so i think we just have to continue to go after these people with the understanding it does not completely eliminate the threat. host: the disagreement over analyzing the threat and what it means -- this from the --nancial times" on friday terror alert returns al qaeda to center stage. u.s. claims of decimated enemy appear exaggerated. in that piece from friday's financial times. we are taking your calls and comments on this issue and the threat of al qaeda right now. our democratl on line from detroit, michigan. good morning, you were on with christopher hill. caller: good morning. withieve the whole thing the embassies and everything was a manufactured crisis because of the snowden release. once again, it is just like the terror alert. one native yellow, one day it is green
and supporting terrorism. they killed osama bin laden, but they're with al qaeda in terms of egypt, which is just bizarre. >> reporter: it doesn't really make any sense when you think that the administration acquiesced in the removal of morsi, but on the other hand, the united states doesn't want the egyptian military to absolutely crush dissent because that's a prescription for long civil war that would be very destabilizing and call into question the future ability of egypt to maintain its obligations with israel and everything. >> yep. hotspots all over the place over there. john harwood, thank you. see you later. >> reporter: you bet. >>> we're going to get in a quick break here. when we return, why one insider says forget about larry summers and janet yellen because tim geithner could be the man to follow ben bernanke. >>> first as we head to break, let's check on the national weather forecast with the weather channel's alex wallace. alex. >> good morning to you. it's going to be a hot one across the upper midwest. a lot of areas thought we were done with summer. not the case. extensive heat
what it had to do. you saw president clinton went around all his allies, nato or the u.n., after osama bin laden blew up those east africa embassies in 1998. there's been very limited alliances hitting saddam hussein over various years during the late '90s. there is precedent to this. >> jimmy carter and his carter center in atlanta, peter, they put out a statement earlier today before the secretary of state's comments, before the intelligence assessment release, certainly before the president just spoke at the white house. among other things, the jimmy carter center said this. a punitive military response without a u.n. security councilman date or broad support from nato and the arab league would be illegal under international law and unlikely to alter the course of the war. what do you make of that, peter? >> you know, something can be illegal under international law but still be a le wrgitimate usf force which may seem like a paradox. certainly there is going to be no u.n. resolution. there will not be it looks like a nato kind of collective security article 5 type thing where, you
at the take-down of osama bin laden, when they came in one of the helicopters crashed but they had backup helicopters as a contingency plan. so that's all this is. no plans to put any marines on the ground anywhere and they don't even really see that that's a likelihood or even could happen by accident. >> okay. what are they talking about at the pentagon in terms of the timing of an assault? as you know, we had senator john mccain saying this could be a one-day event. in the pentagon, is there a suggestion maybe a multi-day or are they being definitive about that at all? >> well, it could be a one-day event if, in fact, these tomahawk cruise missiles are so accurate and they take out most, if not all of the targets that were originally aimed for. but usually, you know, after the smoke clears and the satellites hover overhead and they say oh, we missed this, we missed that, and there could be a cleanup strike for at least one day, and then perhaps a third. but people are looking generally at one, possibly two days. it would probably be extraordinary for three. but you know, that's always
in the 1980s in afghanistan when we armed the mujahadeen, now known as al qaeda, osama bin laden and others. that principle that was applied then was the enemy of our enemy is our friend. that's bad foreign policy. we should not be applying that in syria but we should be engaged in every possible way. i mentioned the russians a little while ago and in every possible way to get this under control. yes, hezbollah is tied up in this. the future of israel is tied up in this. we want israel to survive and prosper for everything it stands for but we also want -- >> time, sir. holt: we want a peaceful solution for palestinians in the area. what is going on in syria affects that. >> thank you, sir. madam speaker. oliver: i believe if the united states is to maintain its position as a world power and to dominate as a world power, it is incumbent upon us to pay attention to what is happening in syria. you know, it was very sad that we did not intervene and save more lives in rwanda and i know that there are many people in the international community who know that the united states could have done mor
relations point. in fact, osama bin laden, obviously the most famous terrace of our age, went so far as to say that the media war is 90% of waging jihad. he place the emphasis not on battlefield attacks but on the perception that he could foster among his enemies. now, the very fact that meeting has becomthemedia has become son the very back of public opinion has become so incredibly important puts a great power like the united states, especially a great democratic powers like the united states, at a disadvantage. something very interesting comes up when you look at what's changed in guerrilla warfare, and as part of this book we did a database of insurgencies in 1775, which in is included as an appendix. what we found was that the wind weight for insurgents have gone up since 1945. prior to 1945, the insurgents won about 20% of their wars. since 1945, about 40% of their wars. so the win rate has roughly doubled. what accounts for that? i would argue it's the power of public opinion and propaganda, the ability of even relatively weak groups to bring down stronger adversaries are mars
imprudent in crossing the border, going after osama bin laden. i don't think he's burdened by the history bush. i think he's burdened by his sense of responsibility here. in terms of the analogy you draw, it's slightly different here. it's a different region. we have now the threat of al qaeda that bill clinton -- at least in that instance, wasn't dealing with. you don't want to be in a position where in some way you empower the wrong people which is why, brian, rushing in there was not necessarily the smartest thing to do in the past. but now you have a situation where these weapons have been used. the president did draw a red line. >> there's no ambiguous wmd that we don't -- >> and listen to the president -- >> -- in afghanistan that in the end means nothing -- we've seen children dying -- >> yes, without question. seems to me just listening to the president this morning that he was signaling that he recognizes that as well. i expect they will take action, whether it's the no-fly zone that general wolffe is recommending or surgical strikes, we'll see. >> i understand this, the images a
boasting how he got osama bin laden. sure we might miss going after assad. but you might hit him. and if you do, you end the civil war. >> i also would thinks one thing about charles's philosophy is solid, of course he's the deepest thinker you know. but there is something about a guy who lives in a palace who if you could destroy the pal lasz, take out the department of commerce, he's living a life of luxury. he didn't feel the war. if he's sleeping on a mattress and working off stack tables, i think he'll start to feel some of the pain of this ongoing civil war. i think that would send a message. >> make him feel like college student. >> i bet a lot of money on the fact that that is not the plan they're crafting. i think it will be less severe, just try and do something to send a message before they would go anywhere near trying to take out assad. >> ralph peters writes you might as well teach a snake to juggle as have the obama administration think strategically. so stand by. >>> now the latest on the senseless murder of world war ii hero delbert belton. the second suspect cau
into a prolonged mi military conflict, and they point out that in 1998, afghanistan failed to kill osama bin laden stirred a hornet's nest, and the bombing in kosovo lasted 198 days. in that environment, what should we do? >> and the stocks momentarily took a dip, and didn't look back, and really a great year despite april, may, involvement in that conflict. and you can look back to many of them that the stock market barely noticed in other events much larger ones such as world war ii or the gulf war, it was a definitive strike of the u.s. that turned the market sentiment around. it is not a big issue for it, market, and it started on domestic concerns and not foreign ones. we have the debt ceiling ahead of us and fed tapering sometimes soon, and those are the issues to be resolved and not the situation in syria. >> all right. the price of oil, and you may be right, and what about the price of oil which is clearly higher and some projections that it could go far higher. >> well, i do agree with jeff, simon, of the lrnlg larger issues, and a confluence of things that are driving the prices down. we
, is you have to knock out these people. president obama did it with osama bin laden who was not a leader of a nation, but a leader of the al qaeda movement. the united states did it with saddam hussein. one of the questions, and it is a difficult and collocated question, and i do not want to pretend this is a self-evident answer in terms of what to do, is if i thought is gone, what is an openm? that question. you have analysts on both side of the issue that argue on the key question, which is how strong are the relatively moderate rebel forces in syria? theypeople say because were not aided earlier, they are too weak now and there's not much hope that they could help others, like one of the strategys of the surge actually said that rebel forces that are relatively moderate are fairly strong and we could make a difference. david up next from north carolina. good morning. caller: actually, that is wilson, north carolina. i would like to thank you for being so moderate. your art to a great job interviewing him. it is still speculation that this has not used chemical weapons against his own
to launch the raid that killed osama bin laden. history does demonstrate that force of diplomacy coexist. they interact with each other and they sometimes can come from each other. richard holbrooke, the late richard holbrooke, great american diplomat, i don't think he would have been able to secure the peace at dayton, the peace in bosnia, had we not use force for six weeks to demonstrate to the bosnian serb army that we're not going to commit them to continue to give innocent muslims. and effect it was the use of force that achieve a cease-fire and drove in to the negotiating table where holbrooke worked his magic and brought peace to bosnia after five years of war. so there are times when how to rely on our military and we are fortunate as all of you know to have extraordinary young men and women in our military, in the army, the navy, air force and marines and coast guard and the national guard applaud that. >> and like you who just applauded, i admire the american military. they are absolutely critical to our security. one of the proudest moments of my crew was when i served as u.s.
of osama bin laden come of the president's reelection campaign and you may know her from her great work with the politics team at usa today and the managing editor of the american journalism review. next to rachel is jen pendry and who is not on your program. originally we were going to have an al jazeera reporter here but she has gone over to the mainstream and is now working for cnn, making her ineligible for the panel. so jen kindly agreed to step in and we appreciate that. she is the white house reporter for the huffington post and covers leadership on capitol hill. she joined huffington post a couple of years ago and spent years covering the legislative and executive wrenches of government for "rollcall." probably a walk in the park for her because she started covering the texas state legislature. again, stepping in for camille, so thank you for that. next to jen is john stanton who also has "rollcall" roots rate he is the chair of buzz feed here in washington. then smith, the editor described him as a reporter's reporter with being in his veins. he's a third-generation news man an
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)